Area History

Morristown is named after Gouverneur Morris, one of the signers of the U.S. Constitution and a large landowner in the area. This land tract was one of the original ten towns in the Macomb Grand Purchase in 1787. It was originally called the Haque. The Town is bounded on the North by the St. Lawrence River and on the South by Black Lake; with Chippewa Creek running through the center.

Morristown's claim to fame was established by one of the first incidents in the War of 1812; on July 31, 1812, the first local action in the War of 1812 occurred when the U.S.S. Julia, sailing west from Ogdensburg, met H.M.S. Moira off the Sister Islands opposite Morristown. A three hour battle ensued with little damage and no loss of life.

Settlers continued to arrive in the town and along the shores of Black Lake. At the time of the Civil War, there were sixteen one room schools, eight churches, four cheese factories, three blacksmith shops and five sawmills. Morristown sent 201 soldiers to the Civil War and returning veterans established a Grand Army of the Republic (G.A.R.) Post.

Morristown's most famous industry was the manufacture of Dr. Morse's Indian Root Pills, a nineteenth century cure-all. Dr. Morse's Indian Root Pills were produced in Morristown will into the 20th century.

Area History
Main Street, Morristown circa 1907
Main Street, Morristown circa 1907
Main Street, Brier Hill circa 1907
Main Street, Brier Hill circa 1907
Main Street, Morristown Date Unknown
Main Street, Morristown Date Unknown
McConnell's Windmill
This windmill, circa 1825 and located in Chapman Park in the Village of Morristown, was built by Hugh McConnell, a miller from Scotland. After Mr. McConnell drowned in 1826 the mill was abandoned. Through the 1800's it served as a local jail and during World War II it was operated as an Air Warning Post. After the war it served briefly as the American Legion Club House. The Chapman family donated the land to the Village. This windmill, the only such structure in the area on the American side of the river, is one of seven Morristown structures listed on the National Register of Historic Sites.
McConnell's Windmill
Morristown School
Morristown School
The "Elmer W. Jones"
Automobile Ferry:  Morristown, New York to Brockville, Ontario, Canada
The "Elmer W. Jones"
Black Lake Excursions - Excursion Boat
Black Lake Excursions - Excursion Boat
Black Lake Excursions - Steamboat Oswegatchie
Black Lake Excursions - Steamboat Oswegatchie
The Black Lake Toll Bridge - The Long Bridge

Built 1902 to 1908 and operated as a toll bridge between Edwardsville and Booth Island. The construction of the Long Bridge proved to be a difficult task owing to the fact that the lake bottom was black muck, so deep and soft as to make a foundation a very difficult undertaking. The piles that supported the bridge were driven down some 45 feet into the muck before they were considered secure enough to support the weight. In 1922, the state of New York purchased the bridge and discontinued the tolls. The first Sunday following the purchase of the bridge the entire local community spent the afternoon crossing and recrossing the bridge to celebrate their final victory over the toll taker. On August 17, 1931 the steel bridge was dynamited to make way for the present causeway and a concrete bridge.

The Black Lake Toll Bridge Edwardsville to Booth Island and Town of Macomb
Booth Island Toll Booth
The Red Barn Museum
The Red Barn Museum
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